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What We're Following July 30, 2019

Careers After 50


This article is a couple of years old but still relevant. When you turn 50 there are still lots of opportunities for good careers heading into retirement, but some may require training and education as we enter our 40’s. Take a look at this article and see what AARP thought back in 2017. The choices they called out are definitely still relevant. But if we look 10-15 years in the future, we should also be thinking about how our demographics and population needs might be changing and the service opportunities involved within. 


https://www.aarp.org/work/job-hunting/info-2017/job-fields-workers-in-demand-fd.html


College Checklist for College Students 


Ok, as it states early on that most links lead to Amazon, etc., you have to enter into this list with a bit of skepticism. That said, this is a pretty amazing list of things to bring and consider. One item that gave me pause was the  bed shelfie. With today’s phones, etc. it is like a whole new cell phone accessories market is needed for college kids going off to school. I’m a little surprised to see a graphing calculator on the list. Do people still need them?  


I still remember feeling so proud that I had a real stereo that I got my junior year, and I was able to scrounge up some old family furniture but it seems like today there is a need for some sort of design element to a room. For those kids going off this year, enjoy it as much as you can, while you can. Life gets better after college but the relationships and experiences you gather will last a lifetime. 


https://collegeinfogeek.com/college-packing-list/


A Vegetarian Diet for Children


I won’t be cutting out meats and dairy from our children’s diet yet, but I do play with the idea. I need to retrain my internal recipe box to come up with some new staples to throw in the rotation in order to provide a better mix for my family. This article is about one woman’s advocacy for a vegetarian diet for kids, but the article raises a good question when thinking about “institutional” meal programs and how well they fit with a vegetarian lifestyle. I can only imagine how hard it would be for a family who lived true vegan or vegetarian to be able to rely on public school lunches consistently, but in the future we will likely need to support those needs as consumer preferences and practices change. If we think about it, is it any different than respecting religious views, respecting parental wishes, etc.?


I have had so many good meals that were nutritious and vegetarian over the last couple of years and it does open my mind to new possibilities, but I’ll also admit, its going to be a while before I can completely come around completely.


https://www.chicagoparent.com/sponsored-content/tips-for-going-meat-free-with-kids/


A Radical Proposal to Fund Caregiving for Life


This article in Fast Company talks about the push for Universal Family Care. My more conservative financial views lend me to want to shy away from more government funded programs that would increase taxes etc (even if viewed as a shared expense), but I won’t get into that. One article does not a debate make…That said, the idea is one worth exploring and the idea of potentially lightening the financial burden of full time caregivers or preserving the assets of an elder generation that worked very hard to accumulate nest eggs of all shapes and sizes. The current system feels like it wants to bankrupt people as they age with medicaid not kicking in until assets are exhausted, and taxing estate inheritances, etc. Concepts like these need to be explored in order to find new ways to help lighten the financial stress associated with caregiving, especially if home caregiver’s are “unpaid” but yet reducing some social services burdens that we likely are not systematically able to absorb at this time.


https://www.fastcompany.com/90381834/this-radical-proposal-would-fund-caregiving-throughout-a-persons-whole-life